Posts tagged 'Micropub'

Site-Updates: Easier POSSE with Micropub Edits!

Jonathan Prozzi and I have challenged one another to make a post about improving our websites once a week. This one should have gone up last week!

A few weeks ago I posted some thoughts about my IndieWeb setup called "Easier POSSE with Micropub Edits?" in which I wished for a tool that would let me take a given post from my site, syndicate it to silos like Twitter and Facebook (tweaking the content if I want), and updating the post on my site to show the links to those syndicated copies.

Why?

I failed to make at least one important thing clear in my original post – why do I care about syndication links? There are many reasons.

If I decide that a post should be syndicated to a silo, it's because I want it to reach the people who follow me there and, if that is true, I also want their interactions to come back to my site. So, in these ways, a post isn't "done" unless it is on my site, with syndicated copies on the silos I care about, and with syndication links for brid.gy to feed the interactions back.

Starting at the End

I decided to start by making my site's Micropub server support Micropub Source Content Queries and Micropub Updates. Any tool that helped automate syndication would need this plumbing to operate.

When implementing a new feature, it always helps to have something to test against. So, I went looking for a Micropub client which supported queries and edits. The test suite for Micropub at micropub.rocks includes a lovely implementation report grid, showing which Micropub clients support what features of the spec.

Of the clients listed, two of them were web-based and Open Source. I had played with and liked Inkstone in the past, but its edit features are currently considered a work-in-progress. So, I tried out Micropublish.net, and it was exactly what I was looking for.

Micropublish has a feature to let you enter a URL for a post on your site to edit. It will use Micropub source content queries to get the source data for that post and let you edit the content and other properties of the post. It can then send a Micropub update to save the updated version of the post back to your site, if your server supports updates. It even has a great feature for developers - a "Preview" button will show you exactly what request will be sent to your server for the update.

Screenshot of micropublish.net preview for an update to add a syndication link to a post

Micropublish.net is a great tool for testing out Micropub query and update support, but my Micropub server is bespoke, hastily-written, hand-rolled Python. So, while it was easy enough to add query support, it took me a while to get my code structure cleaned up, write some tests, and actually implement updates.

A New Workflow

I am pleased to say that it works and, with the help of Micropublish.net, I now have a functioning workflow for publishing to my site and syndicating to silos like Twitter and Facebook, even from my phone, without having to open my laptop, edit YAML data, and push git repositories around. It looks like this.

  • Make a new post to my site with a micropub client like Quill.
  • Open the post for editing in micropublish.net (I use Url Forwarder for Android to make this super easy on my phone, a bookmarklet makes it easy on my laptop).
  • In a new tab, log in to Twitter and make a similar post, copy the URL to the new tweet into the Syndication field on my post.
  • Repeat the steps to make posts on Facebook, Mastodon, etc., copying their URLs into the Syndication field.
  • Finally, hit "Update" in micropublish.net to update my post with the syndication links.
Screenshot of micropublish.net with new syndication links

This is still a very manual process, but it now makes it possible to finish a post in a way that I couldn't before. In the spirit of manual until it hurts, I will use this for a while and see what existing pain points remain, and what new ones appear, to help decide what comes next.

Thanks to Barry Frost for micropublish.net and to Tantek for the nudge to write an update!

Site updates: simplifying media, complicating mentions

Jonathan Prozzi and I have challenged one another to make a post about improving our websites once a week. I'm late with this one!

Most of the features on my website are experiments in learning new things. Sometimes I learn a better way of doing something that I've already built into the site and it's time to migrate!

Moving Media files from Git LFS to a Media Endpoint

I build my site with Jekyll, and I store my site's configuration and text content via Git. One of the things that most folks avoid with Git is storing text content (which fits into Git's model of efficiently storing differences over time) with large binary files like images, etc. (which Git cannot manage as efficiently).

When I first set up my site, I made use of Git LFS ("Large File Storage") for managing anything that wasn't text. Any images, video, or audio that I added to my site was stored in an _assets/ folder in a way that matched uploaded files to the posts they were a part of. Git LFS would transparently ship those files off to a secondary server rather than include their content in the Git repository itself. I had to go through some hoops to set up my local GitLab server to support Git LFS and to set up Git LFS with the server that handles receiving new posts via Micropub, compiling and deploying the site.

It turns out that there are many reasons that a site would want to handle media files separately from the text content that refers to them. In fact, it is a common enough pattern that the Micropub standard includes a definition for a separate "media endpoint" to handle file uploads. I shared a Micropub media endpoint implementation that I built called Spano a while back, and it has been working well with support from tools like Quill. So the text content of my site is served from https://martymcgui.re/, and my media files from https://media.martymcgui.re/. With a couple of changes in my code and my workflows, this has become the way I handle all media files for my site.

However, I still had a bunch of files in site being handled by Git LFS, and some of my Jekyll code (plugins and templates) for showing embeds expected files to be on the local filesystem. This past week I took some time to write some scripts to find all references to those local files, migrate them to my media server, and update the outgoing links. I also updated my embed handling so it didn't rely on local files. This let me delete a lot of local metadata I was keeping but not using, like all the EXIF tags in uploaded photos. I am now Git LFS free and it feels like one less thing to worry about.

Better Caching for Mentions from Webmention.io

When I finally started displaying webmentions, I had a very simple model for how to cache all the info from webmention.io. Basically: I stored all mentions in a big array and, when my site went to fetch new mentions, it would keep fetching until it saw the "last" mention again. This led to a bit of a bug where someone might send me a mention, update their page, and send the mention again. My site would not be able to recognize the "last" mention, so it would fetch all my mentions again, leading to everything appearing twice.

This past week I rewrote my mention handling to avoid this problem by replacing this array and storing mentions in a hash based on the source and target. The new code also checks to see if the verification date of the mention has changed (giving me a way to detect and notify about changed mentions in the future). I also reorganized my mention cache to include an index by the target URL on my site. This makes it a bit quicker to find mentions for a given page when rendering out the site.

Neither of these changes are really visible to readers of my site, but they have been useful for cleaning things up. The webmention.io handling in particular has brought my plugin a lot closer to being something I could release for other people to use!