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post from Implementing Webmentions In a world before social media, a lot of online communities existed around blog comments. The particular community I was part of – web standards – was all built up around the personal websites of those involved. As social media sites gained traction, those communities moved away from blog commenting systems. Instead of reacting to a post underneath the post, most people will now react with a URL someplace else. That might be a tweet, a Reddit post, a Facebook emission, basically anywhere that combines an audience with the ability to comment on a URL. Oh man, the memories of dynamic text replacement and the lengths we went to just to get some non-standard text. https://t.co/f0whYW6hh1— One Bright Light ☣️ (@onebrightlight) July 13, 2017 Whether you think that’s a good thing or not isn’t really worth debating – it’s just the way it is now, things change, no big deal. However, something valuable that has been lost is the ability to see others’ reactions when viewing a post. Comments from others can add so much to a post, and that overview is lost when the comments exist elsewhere. This is what webmentions do Webmention is a W3C Recommendation that solves...