This Week in the IndieWeb February 18 - 24, 2017

Audio edition for This Week in the IndieWeb for February 18th - 24th, 2017.

You can find all of my audio editions here.

And maybe you can subscribe with whatever you consume podcasts with on huffduffer.

Music from Aaron Parecki’s 100DaysOfMusic project: Day 48 - Glitch, Day 9, Day 11

Thanks to everyone in the IndieWeb chat for their feedback and suggestions. Please drop me a note if there are any changes you’d like to see for this audio edition!

Episode 5 of Lawful & Orderly: Special Visions Unit is now available for watching on YouTube! L&O:SVU is a weekly live-streaming police procedural set in a fantasy universe played (loosely) with D&D 5th Edition rules.

https://youtu.be/oOeAd0LJUmk

I had a blast playing GM for this episode! Thanks and love to the L&O crew and the jury (a.k.a. our livestream viewers).

Tune in Mondays at 8pm Eastern for the next live episode at twitch.tv/TheRPGAcademy!

★ Favorited https://aaronparecki.com/2017/02/22/15/
post from
A cocktail on the table and a bike on the floor. 🍸🚲😍 #bromptonlife
Replied to https://stream.jeremycherfas.net/2017/a-podcast-about-the-indieweb
post from
A podcast about the Indieweb

Jeremy raises some great points here that mirror some of my own worries about trying to summarize the discussions happening on the IndieWeb wiki and the many #indieweb chat channels.

When I had the initial idea to do an “audio edition” of This Week in the IndieWeb, the question of “who is the audience” seemed to have an obvious answer: folks who would read the newsletter but preferred an audio edition.

However, it quickly became clear that doing a “direct read” of the newsletter — where much of the content is names and links to changes on wiki pages — wouldn’t make a lot of sense when spoken aloud. So, my first crack at the format evolved into answering a slightly broader question: “how can I explain these updates to someone who might not already be familiar with the wiki?”

My short (and unhelpful) answer is: this is hard. The discussions on the wiki tend to be very technical, jargon-heavy, and touch on an extremely wide set of topics. In the first episode, I attempted to give some structure with groupings like “IndieWeb Events”, “Software and Services”, “Silo Updates”, “Silo Issues”, etc., but I agree with Jeremy that it is still very fast and dense. While I want to keep the podcast short (less than 10 minutes), I think a next positive step would be to give topics more time to breathe with some explanatory commas that give context.

It is my hope that projects like this podcast will help find new ways to phrase and frame the things that the IndieWeb community are doing and talking about, helping to reach new folks. I have a feeling it is going to be a lot of work. :}

Thanks to our special guest, you, for picking up the phone now and buying the products in this week’s We Have to Ask Podcast!

https://wehavetoask.com/episodes/2017-02-21-123859/

post from
Who's Shopping Now • Ep 9.99 - Can Curtains Pop Up
Jonathan and Marty really hope that you are shopping now. Please buy these products.
Replied to http://boffosocko.com/2017/02/20/this-week-in-the-indieweb-february-10-17-2017/

Thanks for the write-up! I would absolutely love to see multiple folks posting IndieWeb audio content, including interviews and deeper discussions. Maybe aggregated at IndieNews and converted to podcast format there?

Site updates: Tags and Media Fragments

Over the weekend I created an English audio version of the most recent This Week in the IndieWeb newsletter. This led to some great discussion in the #indieweb chat about improvements and next-steps in creating a podcast from audio posts on one's own website. Today I added a couple of features to my site towards that end.

First up, I added support for "tag aggregations" - essentially, pages that list all posts with a certain tag. So, any future editions of this audio newsletter that I post can be tagged with "this-week-indieweb-podcast" and will then show up on the "This Week in the IndieWeb Podcast" page. It should soon be possible to feed that page to a tool like Granary to convert the feed on that page, with its audio entries, into an RSS feed suitable for subscribing with a podcast app.

Next up, I added support for "Media Fragments", a W3C recommendation that allows linking to a specific timestamp to start (and even stop!) playback of video and audio. Aaron Parecki's recently implemented this on his own site and was kind enough to share the implementation! Now, you can create links that jump to a specific time of any audio or video post on my site.

For example, if you want to quickly jump to the part of the This Week in the IndieWeb audio edition that contains info about the next upcoming Homebrew Website Club meetings, it looks like this: https://martymcgui.re/2017/02/18/151503/#t=54

Media fragments could enable some fun things, such as a list of links that index directly to particular sections of a long recording.

Aaron also documented a fun way to use media fragments for attribution of other people's audio or video posts. For example, my audio newsletter made use of several of Aaron Parecki's pieces from his 100DaysOfMusic project. I gave attribution by linking to Aaron's posts from my post, and because Aaron's site supports Webmentions, you can see that my post shows up in the "mentions" list for one of the clips I used. With media fragment support, it should be possible to have the mentions on Aaron's post link directly to the exact portion of my audio post where it appears!

Features like this give me hope that it could be possible to make an IndieWeb podcasting experience that is richer and more interactive than the current directory model.

★ Favorited https://aaronparecki.com/2017/02/19/4/day-61-media-fragments
post from
Day 61: Supporting Media Fragment URIs for Video and Audio #100DaysOfIndieWeb